Reablement and diversity in aged care and home care | KeepAble
Wellness and Reablement approaches apply to people from all cultural backgrounds. It is important that the information they receive is culturally appropriate and understood by the individual and there are opportunities provided to optimise their independence and wellbeing.

Action plans detailed as part of the Aged Care Diversity Framework can assist providers to identify actions they could take to deliver more inclusive and culturally appropriate services for consumers. It acknowledges that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all approach to diversity and that each provider will be starting from a different place and operating in a different context.

The Aged Care Diversity Framework

The Australian Government is committed to ensuring that aged care is inclusive of consumers from all walks of life. Everyone should be able to access information and receive services that are appropriate for their characteristics and life experiences.

Launched in December 2017, the Aged Care Diversity Framework (the Framework) is a key part of achieving this. This overarching set of actions aims to support all diverse older people.

The Framework recognises that there are many commonalities within and between diverse groups. It covers distinct action plans that aim to address barriers faced by older:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • People from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and gender diverse, and Intersex peoples

The plan can help providers identify actions they could take to deliver more inclusive and culturally appropriate services. It acknowledges that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to diversity. Rather, each provider will be starting from a different place and operating in a different context.

Aged-care-diversity-framework document

These action plans are designed so that providers can work through three levels of actions:

Providers can then decide which are most relevant to their organisation, in consultation with consumers, their support people, and staff.

To review and download the Aged Care Diversity Framework document, click on the brochure cover.

The Aged Care Quality Standards

Delivery of safe and inclusive services to people with diverse needs and life experiences is built into the Aged Care Quality Standards.

Diversity is woven through the standards and underpinned by Standard 1 to value the identity, culture, and diversity of each consumer and to deliver culturally safe care and services. The Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission will assess aged care providers based on the quality of service experienced by service users (consumers).

To read more about the Aged Care Quality Standards, review Standard 1: Consumer Dignity and Choice. Click on the image to open the document.

Consumer-dignity document
Support worker and elderly lady client
Diversity is woven through the standards and underpinned by Standard 1 to value the identity, culture and diversity of each consumer and to deliver culturally safe care and services.

The Benefits of Diversity

There are many benefits for providers in taking action to provide better services to diverse groups. These include opportunities to:

Actions to support inclusive care for
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consumers

The guide goes through six outcomes, taken from the Aged Care Diversity Framework, which provide a guide for assessing current performance, identifying gaps, and designing pathways to improve inclusive
service provision.

Each outcome has example actions to support providers.

If you would like to read the full guide, please click here.

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